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 Post subject: story sharing
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:06 am
Posts: 171
cuma mau sharing aja, kebetulan nemu artikel yang cukup menarik. tanpa ada niat untuk memojokan salah satu agencies atau apapun.
comments are welcome.

monggo :

http://californiadiver.com/tragedy-at-t ... oes-wrong/

cheers,
Candra


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 Post subject: Re: story sharing
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:28 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:51 pm
Posts: 1571
Location: Jakarta
thanks for sharing :)

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BBeXplorers - Indonesia's Center for Diving Excellence | GUE Affiliate | We provide: Diver Training, EFR Training, Halcyon Dive Systems | Need info on joining DAN? E-mail me: rendra [at] banyubiru.org | Join our group on facebook: Banyu Biru Explorers


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 Post subject: Re: story sharing
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:51 pm
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Location: Jakarta
Ini ada story lain, kejadian di Indonesia:

Original link: http://jakartaexpat.biz/other/bent-in-paradise/

Copied content:
Bent in Paradise

If you’re a certified Scuba diver, you know this scene too well; floating around beside a beautiful underwater wall abundant with vibrant coral, getting up-close and personal with a timid pygmy seahorse, or holding on and feeling the force of a strong current blasting over your face as you watch sharks and schools of barracuda in a feeding frenzy in the open waters above you. The opposite of this scene, however, which most divers won’t experience in their lifetime, is the one I’m sitting in now: under 18 metres of atmospheric pressure in a hot, humid and claustrophobic hyperbaric chamber.

The dangers of diving in Indonesia are not heard about as much as the joys are. Naturally, we try to focus on the positives rather than get bogged down with the negatives, and why worry about getting the infamous ‘Bends’ until you’ve actually got it? Unfortunately, there are dangers to diving in Indonesia, which, if all dive outfits were to practice safe management and responsibility, could be significantly avoided.

I am told through the voice on the intercom inside the chamber to take a five-minute break from the oxygen mask. This is my third, and hopefully, final day inside and when resurfaced from this dry dive, total time spent will have been 12.5 hours under pressure in an attempt to alleviate the nitrogen bubbles which have built up in my body after a dive trip to East Kalimantan. Treatment at Jakarta Navy Hospital’s Hyperbaric Centre consists of an examination by one of the Navy doctors, followed by a certain number of hours in the chamber at the relevant pressure table for your condition, combined with pure oxygen treatment for the most part of your stay.

The most common misconception of decompression sickness is that it occurs when you resurface from a deep depth too quickly. The truth is that you can actually get this painful sickness coming up from a depth of only six metres. Divers put their lives into the hands of their equipment, however my dive computer did not enter a decompression dive alert, and many other divers who ‘got deco’ can vouch for me on this.

Giving the ‘OK’ sign from inside the hyperbaric chamber.

Alejandro Septien has been diving for 20 years and has not once had any problems. He is now sitting beside me in the chamber for treatment of Type I DCI. “I don’t understand how this happened,” he tells me. “I always follow the rules!” Alejandro, a Mexican expat and new to Jakarta and Indonesia, was diving around the idyllic island of Bangka, and on this occasion had to rent all his gear from his local dive operator, including a dive computer. “I did all my safety stops, didn’t do any deep dives, and didn’t drink the night before, but a few hours after I had ascended, I started to feel a pain in my back. Initially I thought it was from the strain of carrying the scuba equipment, but after two days when the pain moved to my legs, I knew something was wrong.” In Alex’s case, the gauge of the rented equipment was off, causing him to do his safety stops deeper than planned.

Dr. Padma, the Chief Navy Dr. at the Hyperbaric Medical Centre in Benhil insists that at the first sign of decompression sickness, attention must be given immediately. “There are many factors which can lead towards decompression sickness, including not getting enough sleep, consuming alcohol or being physically tired,” she explains. “If you have any tingling sensations, pain in your body, visual disturbances, vertigo, fatigue, lethargy, or a feeling of confusion, come to our hospital for a consultation immediately.” The sooner you treat symptoms, the more chance you have of fully recovering. After treatment you are also told to rest, drink a minimum of three litres of water a day, not fly for at least 72 hours and, should you live on a high floor in an apartment, take the stairs or go up in the lift very gradually.

If you have insurance with Divers Alert Network (DAN) then your treatment will be fully covered, however for many, decompression sickness can cost thousands of dollars, and more importantly, your life. Rendra Hertiadhi, Banyu Biru Explorer founder and DAN Instructor, believes that a common misconception is that dives within a No Decompression Limit or within dive table range are 100% safe. “This is not the case,” he tells me. “Generally dives conducted within NDL should be safe, but DCS could still happen and hit an unlucky diver.” According to DAN statistics, five people’s lives were lost to diving in Indonesia in 2011, of which bodies were recovered, and at least 39 recreational divers were treated for DCS in Indonesia. “Whilst many of these were for mild cases of DCS, several were of a very serious nature, requiring urgent assistance,” Rendra adds.

In stunning East Kalimantan, our dive operator at Nabucco Island Resort were irresponsible by allowing maverick dive guides to continue to work, even when they were aware of their negligence; escorting tourists down to depths of 40 metres without mentioning this in the pre-dive brief and ascending carelessly without proper safety stops. Regrettably the owners of the dive resort were not willing to take any responsibility for their reckless guides. Although their dive outfit come across as reputable, the results were to the contrary. It is always best to do some reconnaissance work before you plan a dive trip and ask fellow divers for advice on trustworthy dive operators.

Of course we are all responsible for our own actions but naturally, when you are new to an area, you trust your local guide, putting your lives in their hands and following blindly. Adrienne Jo Salcau is a PADI certified Divemaster and guide, and one many have come to trust. “I never take divers past 30 metres unless they’re very, very experienced,” she tells me as we discuss my dives at Nabucco. “First thing is a check dive so I can assess their skills. I don’t bring unfamiliar or inexperienced divers right into current or deep dives. If I’m doing four dives in a day, 30m is the absolute max and should be done first, then each dive should be shallower and I always, always do a safety stop. Being a dive guide involves a lot of things, but the main priority is safety.”

Survivors of decompression sickness with the staff at the Hyperbaric Medical Centre, Jakarta.

Diving is a wonderful sport and pastime, which brings us closer to the curious wonders of the underwater world and its inhabitants, but we cannot deny the dangers involved and must remember that we are merely guests in the ocean. Allow more time between dives, do fewer dives per trip (it’s not a race), always do safety stops and come up slowly, allow a minimum of 24 hours after your last dive before you fly, and ensure every dive guide provides a proper brief, which you stick to. Don’t allow yourself to become a statistic and may you never have to sit inside this hyperbaric chamber to save your life.

Rumah Sakit TNI AL Dr. Mintohardjo (Jakarta Royal Navy Hospital)
Jl. Bendungan Hilir No. 17, Jakarta.
021 5703081 Ext. 176/326
Direct line to Hyperbaric Medical Centre: 021 5732221

About Angela Richardson
Angela is Jakarta Expat's Editor and enjoys drinking wine and fighting crime. Bother her at [email protected]

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BBeXplorers - Indonesia's Center for Diving Excellence | GUE Affiliate | We provide: Diver Training, EFR Training, Halcyon Dive Systems | Need info on joining DAN? E-mail me: rendra [at] banyubiru.org | Join our group on facebook: Banyu Biru Explorers


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 Post subject: Re: story sharing
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:39 pm
Posts: 913
Location: Jakarta
"Bent in Paradise"

Udah tau DCS theory itu berdasarkan mathematical model, solid si solid, tetap semua ini educated estimation dan tidak ada badan manusia yang sama. Makin tua kita makin lemot, lemot ini dan ono dan termasuk lemot gassing off dan lain2 dan kondisi kita saat di resort atau di kapal atau saat menyelam tidak lah sama.

Jika ada orang percaya total bahwa diving dengan ikuti tabel atau computer dan pasti 100% aman, yah kasian lah ama tuh orang :mrgreen:

Simple logic lah

01. Pergi pakai kapal tak ada sunshade, sudah beda parameter nya di banding kapal pakai tutup atas dan diver tidak kepanasan dan dihidrasi.

02. Pergi ke lokasi selam yang jarak 5 menit dengan 30 menit dan betapa sardencis nya kita berjejal ria di kapal saja sudah beda. Jika kita bisa duduk nyaman dan badan tidak ketekuk pletot pletot gaya sardencis, yang umur udah kayak eke di 45 dan udah kaku ni semua ball joint dan tie rod di banding 6 tahun lalu ajah deh...it makes a great difference.

03. Minuman. Ada kapal pas pas san minuman dan diver malas minum pula. 3 liter sehari TIDAK cukup di negara tropis dengan matahari kencang-cang-cang dan pake wetsuit pulak sebelum diving ( rugi dan banyak keringatan ).
5 liter target nya minum atau lebih..bau bau deh tuh wetsuit :))



TRAGEDY AT THE BREAKWATER: A CHECKOUT DIVE GOES WRONG

04. Kapal sempit dan pake alat susah, ini juga pengaruh sebab ketenangan dan ini over extertion di permukaan nama nya. Been there done that.

"Being fully suited, my girlfriend began overheating and felt choked during the 45 minute session, which generated more pre-dive stress. No doubt, others in the class felt the same."
Contoh klasik "physical stress & abuse " di darat yang tidak di hitung.


05. KEMUDAHAN vs SENGSARA Vs BIAYA
"Everyone suited up (including my girlfriend and I), and marched down the concrete steps to the beach and then halted. The older instructor announced another training session was to commence. This surprise new class: Beach Entry. He told the class to ‘take a seat on the steps’. My girlfriend nearly fell down when trying to sit in all of her heavy SCUBA gear and landed very heavily on the sand-covered steps next to the beach. Other divers endangered themselves as they walked between the students blocking the entire stair landing. During the class (and unknown to her or I) her primary second stage regulator was ground into the sand behind her SCUBA tank, packing sand in it."

Cerita lucu nih. Saya kalo menyelam kagak mau susah. Setelah tangki terpasang, jalan tidak mau lebih dari 5 meter. Artinya harus menyelam pakai kapal atau dari dermaga atau caddy bawakan tabung ke pantai sedekat dekat nya dengan air. Tahun lalu waktu test GoPro di Cafe Garam di Bali, dekat Amed atau dimana gitu, gearing up 100 meter dari pantai. Kampret dan saya memang ada problem pinggang, 3 syaraf ke jepit neh, kudu jalan 100 meter pake tabung dan pake kaos kaki doank ( sebab fin full foot ), pinggang mau patah rasanya. Masuk ke air, heart rate sudah sama ama kalo lawan arus :-o
Lesson learn, besok2 minta 1 staff bawakan tabung ke pantai dah....umur dan problem pinggang kagak bisa di lawan.


"I swam over to my assigned buddy and stayed close to him, as ordered. The entire SCUBA class swam out towards the older instructor, and once past the surf zone he announced yet another surprise class: ‘Kelp Crawling.’ One at a time, each student was told to swim-crawl over a raft of kelp."
Ini contoh menyelam efficient, efficient biaya sebab berenang kudu jauh MANUAL finning dan tidak pakai rubber boat.
Lalu surf zone pulak....wele2, mati lah.
My tips : Make our money work, sewa kapal kecil. Buat badan senyaman nyaman mungkin di permukaan sebab kecuali bawa scooter, di air tetap MANUAL work kita nya.

Moral of the story adalah, semua ini berlawanan dengan the golden rule of diving.
" Keep calm, relax & do not over exert"

Bagi yang masih muda, OK lah. Cukup 6 tahun lalu, yang umur 10-20 tahun di bawah saya, kelenger dah kalo ikutin saya diving mah. Sekarang, eke yang kelenger.....wak kik kik kik.

Bagi yang udah past prime time, baiknya biarkan dompet banyak berkerja di permukaan dan mari hanya bersusah payah melawan alam di bawah air....TOK.

Orang yang ngos-ngos-san di permukaan lalu tidak berhenti dan stabilized dulu minimal sekian menit, karena kondisi permukaan laut atau medan nya tidak memungkinkan, ini potensi bahaya yang carry over ke bawah air sebab tanpa bisa tenang dan nyaman, diving is a DISASTER.
.

Diving di air dingin gaya California dan air butek emang sengsara dah.
Udah timah nya banyak, mata melihat viz cuma 2 meter memberikan effek sikologis buruk.
"The water the student were training in was less than ideal, at approximately 57 degrees ( farenheit yah, jadi ini 14C ) in temperature with less than 2 meters visibility at a depth of 26-27 fsw."

Berbahagia lah kita yang di negara tropis.... :-bd

.

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